Annual Reports

2018 Annual Report

April 3, 2019

SCEPA's 2018 Annual Report documents how we advance and translate the bold economic ideas of our non-mainstream economists at The New School to change the course of our future.

We advance economic policy research by two means:

1) Research and Student Success: We start with our unique and impartial position as a think tank within a university, which allows us to advance research at the highest academic standards, ready for peer review. Next, our long-range vision includes a fundamental mission to educate tomorrow’s economic leaders. Each year, we hire 5-10 students with the goal of serving as their springboard into academia and highprofile economic policy positions. Recent examples include former SCEPA Research Associates Lauren Schmitz, future assistant professor at La Follette School of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Kate Bahn, economist at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth.

2) Public Engagement: SCEPA serves as a public platform for our research to advance action. We maintain a high-profile lecture series on how to enact climate change mitigation while preserving economic growth and feature speakers studying the effects of inequality on sustainable growth. Our Retirement Equity Lab (ReLab) works to create a modern retirement system that reflects today’s workplace and people’s ability to save. The effort includes a national campaign with coalition partner, the Economic Policy Institute (EPI), to highlight the need for a Guaranteed Retirement Account (GRA) policy in the 2020 presidential campaign.

SCEPA is committed to engaging in the issues that affect Americans’ economic well-being and support our hopes for a better future. We are grateful for the generosity of our supporters and partners in these efforts and are excited to share our progress during the 2018 fiscal year with you.

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2017 Annual Report
2016 Annual Report
2015 Annual Report

About SCEPA

SCEPA works to focus the public economics debate on the role government can and should play in the real productive economy - that of business, management, and labor - to raise living standards, create economic security, and attain full employment.