Insights Blog

Our ongoing video series, SCEPA Responds, brings together expert economists, professors, fellows, and research associates to discuss current economic issues and challenge economic doctrines that create systemic inequity. The series focuses on areas such as race, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth and crisis, to provide insights for working families, older workers, the working poor, minorities, and more.

While tax increment financing (TIF) is a common tool for municipalities to fund economic development (read how it works here), it is responsive to the legal, political, and economic environments of the locality in which it is implemented. 

The World Bank commissioned a team of New School economists to investigate fiscal policies that will help us move from a high-carbon economy to a low-carbon economy while minimizing financial instability.

Willi Semmler, NSSR’s Arnhold Professor of International Cooperation and Development, says his students reflect the spirit of the time and can play an active role in shaping the world of the future.

Urban Matters, a publication of The New School's Center for New York City Affairs, featured an update on post-pandemic Hudson Yards by SCEPA researchers.

SCEPA's 2019 annual report documents how we bring reality into conventional economics by providing alternatives to mainstream thinking, empowering policymakers with economic insights, and creating lasting change for everyone. 

Brief— SCEPA's latest research finds that the COVID-19 recession worsens the inequality of job safety among older workers. 

About SCEPA

SCEPA works to focus the public economics debate on the role government can and should play in the real productive economy - that of business, management, and labor - to raise living standards, create economic security, and attain full employment.