Insights Blog

How #MeToo Power Dynamics Affect Economists

January 18, 2018
Economist Bina Agarwal presented her research on gender inequality and development at The New School. Economist Bina Agarwal presented her research on gender inequality and development at The New School.

For a woman, being an economist in academia is not unlike any other workplace.

In an interview with PBS about gender and power in the economics profession, ReLab Director and economist Teresa Ghilarducci notes that women economists face not only sexual harassment and the undermining of their ability from male coworkers, but they also face more age discrimination.

Evidence can be found in the fact that women’s pay peaks at the early age of 45. After that, a woman’s compensation falls 9% from 45 to 55 and another 9% from 55 to 65. For men, earnings peak in their early to mid-fifties.

Ghilarducci asserts that sexual harassment is not about sex, but dominance. With more women earning higher-level degrees, competition increases. Sexual harassment and discrimination serve as tools to protect privileged status.

About SCEPA

SCEPA works to focus the public economics debate on the role government can and should play in the real productive economy - that of business, management, and labor - to raise living standards, create economic security, and attain full employment.