inequality - The New School SCEPA

Amid reports of bulk ballot collection, fake ballot boxes, voter intimidation and other potential efforts to manipulate or cast doubts on the voting process in the U.S. 2020 election, The Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA) hosts a conversation with Jessica Pisano, Associate Professor of Politics at The New School for Social Research. 

Much like the United States, the Brazilian government was slow to react to the virus, and Brazil joined us as one of the global epicenters of COVID-19 cases and deaths. New research shows that, also like the States, pre-existing inequities in living and working conditions along racial, educational, and class lines are at the root of the higher infection and mortality rates observed in low-income and non-white communities. The research also shows that without government aid, COVID exacerbates inequality.

Last updated July 20, 2020.

A compendium of economic thoughts and policy recommendations in response to the coronavirus. 

A retirement crisis looms as the labor market becomes less friendly to older workers when they are most numerous and least able to retire.

Brief— Social Security benefits are progressive and reduce the unequal distribution of retirement wealth generated by a broken employer-based retirement systemSocial Security benefits are progressive and reduce the unequal distribution of retirement wealth generated by a broken employer-based retirement system.

Workers in low-wage households are more likely to experience economic shocks and to withdraw from their retirement accounts, exacerbating pre-existing inequalities in the retirement savings system.

In a first-of-its-kind analysis, ReLab’s latest policy note reveals sharp inequalities in retirement wealth.

Teresa Ghilarducci, labor economist and director of SCEPA's Retirement Equity Lab (ReLab), made the following statement regarding Congressional Republicans' proposal to cut contribution limits for 401(k) retirement savings contributions:

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