Insights Blog

Our ongoing video series, SCEPA Responds, brings together expert economists, professors, fellows, and research associates to discuss current economic issues and challenge economic doctrines that create systemic inequity. The series focuses on areas such as race, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth and crisis, to provide insights for working families, older workers, the working poor, minorities, and more.

Much like the United States, the Brazilian government was slow to react to the virus, and Brazil joined us as one of the global epicenters of COVID-19 cases and deaths. New research shows that, also like the States, pre-existing inequities in living and working conditions along racial, educational, and class lines are at the root of the higher infection and mortality rates observed in low-income and non-white communities. The research also shows that without government aid, COVID exacerbates inequality.

Research from SCEPA economists studying the economic impacts of climate change and mitigation policies show green bonds have great potential to help countries across the world increase environmental investments and reach emission targets.

While tax increment financing (TIF) is a common tool for municipalities to fund economic development (read how it works here), it is responsive to the legal, political, and economic environments of the locality in which it is implemented. 

On August 14th, the anniversary of the Social Security Act of 1935, the Joint Economic Committee (JEC) of U.S. Congress released two reports on the weakening of the American retirement system featuring research from SCEPA.

The World Bank commissioned a team of New School economists to investigate fiscal policies that will help us move from a high-carbon economy to a low-carbon economy while minimizing financial instability.