labor - The New School SCEPA

Working Paper—Time spent unemployed can have a profound impact on the quality of a worker's life, future, and family. SCEPA's latest working paper focuses on gender and racial disparities in the time it takes to find work and how these periods are impacted by unemployment insurance.

Brief— Working longer is often proposed as the solution to the retirement crisis caused by older workers’ lack of retirement assets, but new research from SCEPA's ReLab shows this assumption doesn't match older workers' real experiences in the labor market.

Much like the United States, the Brazilian government was slow to react to the virus, and Brazil joined us as one of the global epicenters of COVID-19 cases and deaths. New research shows that, also like the States, pre-existing inequities in living and working conditions along racial, educational, and class lines are at the root of the higher infection and mortality rates observed in low-income and non-white communities. The research also shows that without government aid, COVID exacerbates inequality.

Research note— New research shows that even before the COVID-19 recession, only 36% of workers ages 25-64 were participating in a retirement plan at work, a five percentage point decrease from five years prior.

Last updated July 20, 2020.

A compendium of economic thoughts and policy recommendations in response to the coronavirus. 

Brief— Workers at all earnings levels would benefit from expanding Social Security. SCEPA proposes defaulting workers into “Catch-Up” contributions, where— starting at age 50— they would contribute an additional 3.1% of their salary. 

Working paper— Social Security benefits are progressive and reduce the unequal distribution of retirement wealth generated by a broken employer-based retirement systeThe Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) can cause wage declines for workers who do not receive the tax credit.